Tarawera Landcare 2115 began in 2015 and as the name suggests we have a hundred-year view. TLC2115 sits under the umbrella of the Lake Tarawera Ratepayers’ Association (LTRA).

Projects

Kariri Point – this has been our flagship project to date. We have formal support for the work we are doing from Te rua Umakaria Trustees, who represent the many beneficial individual owners and the BOP Regional Council, who have been extremely helpful and continue to be so by way of providing training, money, equipment, native plants and advice.

 

The Sir John Logan Campbell Residuary Trust have also been very supportive of our endeavours by donating funds for us to employ contractors to do the ‘heavy lifting’. The Rotorua Lakes Council via the Community Matching fund have enabled us to purchase a Honda Pioneer (Rhonda – the Red Honda) which is worth her weight in gold.

 

None of the progress to date could have been achieved without the generous giving of time by the volunteers who show up on the second Saturday of the month for three or four hours to get stuck in. We have logged thousands of hours of volunteer time on the Point. To join us, meet on the second Saturday of the month at 9.00 am at the entrance to Kariri Point in Boatshed Bay. There are also community members who haven’t attended working bees but have given money or equipment to the cause.

Kariri Point - First corner

These photos are taken from exactly the same photo point.

The first one was taken in March 2018 when we started our journey. The area was infested with Old Man’s Beard (Clematis Vitalba), a creeping vine that seeks to smother and eventually kill its host in order to overtake the forest canopy.

We have removed the Old Man’s Beard (OMB) and replanted with native trees that were endemic to this area and included a walking/access track which is periodically spread with mulch.

We’d also like to thank the native birds that are now populating the Point and benefitting from the planting and natural regeneration that is occurring as well as some concerted pest control (rats and possums). Kereru, tui, bellbirds, whiteheads, fantails, grey warblers, moreporks, shining cuckoos (in the summer) and the occasional falcon.

Spencer Road – although not given the same regular attention as Kariri Point it does get some attention from individuals looking after their own patch. The major invasive pests are flowering cherries, old man’s beard, climbing spindleberry, tradescantia (wandering willy), wild ginger, jasmine to name a few. Links to these from BOPRC website https://www.boprc.govt.nz/your…

 

Kariri Point - First corner 2018 - 2022

This area was particularly bad with established OMB growth, it required a large amount of clearing and removal of the rubbish.

As you can see in the final photo at right, we are seeing growth of thistles which we try to deal with before they flower.

Kariri Point Central Area 2018 - 2022

The image left was taken in March 2018 when we started our journey.

This area was also badly infested with Old Man’s Beard (Clematis Vitalba) and you can see how it was smothering the fallen trees. We have removed the OMB, as well as Black Nightshade, Inkweed and Acacia trees.

The bottom photo shows how successful our replanting has been. However, the replanting process is not without challenges including drought, predation by possums and rabbits and weed infestation.

Otumutu Lagoon Revival 2020 - 2024

March 2020: We started with a blackberry-infested mess that obscured the streambed and was generally unpleasant. This infestation was cut down with hedge trimmers and no herbicides other than stump swab applied to the blackberry stumps.

 

January 2024: (Right) this is the same view after clearing the stream of debris and watercress which was impeding the stream flow.

(Left) March 2020: More blackberry in the same area, the bramble in places was over three metres high and had not been tackled in over 10 years.

(Centre) March 2022: The blackberry was cut down and mulched or piled up and composted. An unfortunate downside was exposure of the streambed as illustrated.

Later in 2022, planting with sedge, cabbage tree, kowhai and native grasses was undertaken.

(Right) Jan 2024: This is the same view now the sedge has grown and partially covered the streambed providing shelter and protection for the trout

Left: March 2022 this was the result of clearing the blackberry and willow prior to planting.

 

 

Right. January 2024: View from the same position showing the growth of native sedge.

March 2020: The blackberry infestation from another angle.

Jan 2024: the same view two years later with healthy growth of sedge and young cabbage trees.

Spencer Road and the lake front

Although not given the same regular attention as Kariri Point it does get some attention from individuals looking after their own patch. The major invasive pests are flowering cherries, old man’s beard, climbing spindleberry, tradescantia (wandering willy), wild ginger and jasmine to name a few. If you are interested in improving ‘your patch’ see Links to these from BOPRC websitehttps://www.boprc.govt.nz/your…